Positive Design

How to Make ‘Thigh Advertising’ Campaigns Scalable

Okay, so ‘thigh advertising’ is the new news in the mad bad world of advertising (see video below).  Girls selling thigh space for $65 a day, in return for which they add a temporary branded tattoo to their thighs, and agree to flash those thighs.  For example, in Tokyo, thigh ads have been used since the beginning of the year to promote brands, bands and movies – including the DVD of Seth MacFarlane’s movie ‘Ted’.

The logic is simple – in an ad-cluttered world, (attractive) thighs attract attention.  Thighs with logos attract brand attention.  Good logic, a good PR stunt perhaps, and perhaps even a good way for between-shoot fashion models to earn a little extra cash.

But effort and reach is a problem.

Models are called in, tattoos are applied manually, and only then do others get to see the branded thighs in the street. But how many people actually get to see this branded thigh space?  The Tokyo agency behind the Ted thigh campaign (Absolute Territory) claims to have  3000 thigh boards on its books, but only a fraction of these thighs get branded and seen per campaign.

So is there an opportunity to create a next-generation scalable thigh advertising agency, a kind of Charlie’s Angels, where a network of agents are sent ‘missions’ electronically, along and inkjet printable temporary tattoos? Throw in some performance marketing – rumunerating the owners of thighs based on the number of views/likes their branded thighs get online, and you have a boutique agency with skin in the game. What do you think? Could thigh advertising scale?

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Chartered psychologist specialising in consumer behaviour, wellbeing and technology. Certified CX professional experienced in Design Thinking. A researcher, writer and speaker, Paul is head of Digital Insight at SYZYGY.

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